Wednesday, February 17, 2010

Bandsaw Mill

Saw Mill

A saw mill can be a huge asset to a small farm; there’s lumber for building, edgings for firewood, saw dust for gardens and the ability to earn some extra money by sawing lumber for other people.

We’ve spent the past few years researching sawmills and even started to build our own. But with projects piling up and trees falling in the woods we decided now was the time to purchase one. We bought ours from Thomas Bandsaw Mills because we like how their mills are made, and it’s a local company, only about an hour from our home.

Already word has gotten out and we are making a little extra money sawing lumber for a local farm.

My list of projects keeps growing --- now to only find the time to get them done!

Cutting the First Log

13 comments:

  1. Wow, very cool. Congrats on the new tool! I have no idea about bandsaws, though it looks from the picture like it is cutting the log into boards? Other types of pieces too? What types of trees have you been using it on? Thanks for sharing.

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  2. It is really cool and a lot of fun. It will cut the log into whatever size boards you need, 1", 2", 6" or any other thickness. It will do beams, etc. We've been sawing softwoods (pine and spruce) and ash so far. I hardly ever see my husband anymore! (Well, I can see him, just can't talk to him over the noise!)

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  3. What fun, a new toy! Such an essential one too, it's a beauty!

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  4. If you should saw cedar-save the sawdust! Gather it up into a sock, tie it off and put it in closets and drawers. Great moth repellent and keeps everything fresh!

    Congrats on the new work-force crew member!

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  5. Lord Wellbourne, Great idea on the cedar. We are hoping to do a deck this summer with cedar, so we should get a lot of saw dust!

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  6. Awesome!! Heavy machinery :)

    Big fan of your blog and flickr pics... We live in San Francisco, CA and we're making a trip in late March to the east coast to visit friends in Brooklyn, NY and Machias, ME!! We'll be passing through Portland as well. Excited to visit the great state of Maine! -Ken and Erin

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  7. Ken and Erin, Thanks! I think you will enjoy your time in Maine. Hopefully the weather will be good for you. I enjoy your blog as well : )

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  8. Nancy, I keep forgetting to ask you about your fruit trees...we just planted a few (pear, peach, apple, plum, another fig) and I am wondering if you have any advice on ways to control bugs? I know we live in completely different areas, and I don't know enough about it yet, but thought if it works for you, it might work for me. Emily

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  9. Emily, The apple trees we have have been here for years and years (long before we came) and we have never done anything to them. We planted cherry and plum trees, but have never had a bug problem. I think I would use a compost tea if we did (we've used it on grapes with good luck). I have been told that the bug traps don't work well, they call in other bugs from surrounding areas and create more of a problem. Nancy

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  10. Thanks Nancy. I am glad you haven't had any problems. I am thinking positively that we won't, but I want to be prepared. After planting them I tilled a 5' ring around the base and I will work in some composted horse manure and then top it with mulch to help through the hot summers. I WILL use compost tea! I have still yet to make it, thanks for the suggestion (and reminder). Somehow the days go by and I have yet to make it. Emily

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  11. I know what you mean, Emily. I have a giant list of things I want to do that never seem to get done......oh well....

    I think your composted horse manure will help your trees dramatically. If they are nice and healthy hopefully pests won't bother them! ~Nancy

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