Friday, October 29, 2010

Making Fruit Vinegar

Fruit Vinegar, Fermenting


Making Fruit Vinegar


Except for apple cider vinegar, we haven't had very good luck making vinegars from scratch (not to be confused with herbal vinegars, which come out great).

Thanks to the book Wild Fermentation: The Flavor, Nutrition, and Craft of Live-Culture Foods we have made a wonderful fruit vinegar, and it was so easy!

We took all the fruit pulp that we cooked down for wine. Basically raspberries, blackberries, blueberries, plums....any fruit. To make the wine we cook the fruit as you would to make juice and we saved all the fruit pulp. In the book it is called “Fruit Scrap Vinegar” and they say to use any fruit scraps.

Wash and sterilize a gallon glass jar. Put all your fruit in. Dissolve ¼ cup of sugar (we used honey) into 1 quart of water. Pour over the fruit.

Place cheese cloth on top of the jar and secure with a rubber band.

After about one week strain off the fruit and return liquid to the jar.

Let the jar sit two to three more weeks, (lightly shake occasionally) and test after two weeks. When the flavor is to your liking, the vinegar is ready. Transfer to a clean jar.

It really is that simple. We have done it twice and now have two unusual, tasty vinegars!

12 comments:

  1. Rad. So rad. I can't wait to have fruit to utilize for wine and vinegar. can't wait!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I assume that in order to have pulp you have to actually have fruit. Which means you must try to restrain yourself from eating every bit of fruit that comes your way right down to the seeds/pit. Hmmmm, this is going to be tough but I'll give it a try. Winter is an excellent time to develop willpower.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I don't know...I don't have much will power in winter, especially when it comes to fruit! This vinegar could be made from the pulp left over after making jelly, but there are times when that pulp tastes good on yogurt. It is a tough situation!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hi Nancy,
    I tried making some pineapple vinegar last year using the outside skins and core, but I had a problem with mold. I will try your way, because I was told to just let it sit, where you are taking the fruit out after the 1st week and actively moving it around after that. Thank just might be the key. How do you store it after it reaches the flavor you want? Fridge or shelf? Thanks for sharing. Sincerely, Emily

    ReplyDelete
  5. Hi Emily, I have been storing it on the shelf, we'll see if that's okay. I also tried pineapple vinegar last year and had the same problem as you, and also let the fruit sit longer than a week. I was so happy how this fruit vinegar came out. We have done two different batches and both have been good.
    ~ Nancy

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hi Nancy, I hope you and your family had a good Thanksgiving. Sincerely, Emily

    ReplyDelete
  7. Thank you, Emily.....and you as well. : )

    ReplyDelete
  8. Who is the author of Wild Fermentation? I'm ordering the book.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Hi Dr. Momi, Wild Fermentation is written by Sandor Ellix Katz. It really is a very informative book.
    ~ Nancy

    ReplyDelete
  10. I have a crock of apple cider vinegar I was making in the garage (not used for cars). It was just starting to smell like vinegar. Then my husband was doing a project in there that got dust everywhere. Now it smells gross. I don't know if he got something in it or what happened but it took 3 months to get to that point and now it's not useable...so sad. I'll have to give this way a shot. Would this work with apple too?

    ReplyDelete
  11. Tiff...that is very sad. It takes so long for apple cider vinegar to be made, then to loose it. I am not sure if this method would work with apples, I have not tried it that way. Worth a try. It worked out well with the fruit we used.
    ~ Nancy

    ReplyDelete